The all new DexNet 2.0

Roboticists at UC Berkeley have built a robot that, with a 99 per cent success rate, can grab and move unfamiliar, tangible objects. This new technology may be able to solve the problem of robots not being able to pick up awkwardly shaped objects such as shoes and bottles. With this new nimble-fingered robot, named DexNet 2.0, it is envisioned that such technology could revolutionise the manufacturing and supply chain industry.

EIT Stock Image

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image: DexNet2.0. Credit: Adriel Olmos, CITRIS Media


Waste brine to fresh water: a new recovery method

A new way to extract almost 100 per cent of the water from highly concentrated salt solutions has been developed by Engineers at the University of California. The research incorporates carbon nanotube-based heating element that majorly improves fresh water extraction. The new method will aid water shortages in dry regions, as well as helping to reduce concerns surrounding high salinity brine disposal (such as hydraulic fracturing waste).


New translating device speaks 8 languages

A new device, called One2One, could be a replacement for the need of translators!

One2One, powered by IBM’s supercomputer ‘Watson’, takes approximately 3-5 seconds to translate a conversation and play it back. The handy device can pick up eight languages - including English, Japanese, French, Italian, Spanish, Brazilian, Portuguese, German and Chinese. To work properly, the two people having the conversation must be wearing the device. One2One does not need WiFi or phone connectivity to operate, meaning that it can even work in remote areas without draining your phone’s battery.

See below for a video on how it works.

    


Fast and furious electronics

In the world of fast-paced technology, there is always a push to create smaller and faster electronic units with longer battery life. Scientists from the universities of California and Massachusetts have created a ‘heterostructure’: a 25-atom thick TI (topological insulators) film that adheres to an insulating magnetic film. Devices containing TI are favoured by engineers because it makes the device strong enough to combat errors and defects, so that faulty applications do not end up crashing the entire system.


Works cited

University of California - Berkeley. "Meet the most nimble-fingered robot ever built." 1 June 2017. ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170601192717.htm

University of California - Riverside. "Squeezing every drop of fresh water from waste brine: Research expands efforts to provide clean water for the world's growing population." May 29 2017. ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170529133659.htm

University of California - Riverside. "Accelerating the quest for quicker, longer-lasting electronics: Research makes topological insulators magnetic well above room temperatures." 23 Jnue 2017. ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170623155508.htm

Umer sohail. New Earpiece Translates Foreign Languages As You Have A Conversation”. 26 June 2017. Wonderful Engineering. https://wonderfulengineering.com/new-earpiece-translates-foreign-languages-as-you-have-a-conversation/