Unit Name

TRANSIENT ANALYSIS AND STABILITY

Unit Code

MEE602

Unit Duration

12 weeks

Award

Master of Engineering (Electrical Systems) Duration: 2 years

Year Level

Two

Unit Creator/Reviewer

Dr. Tony Auditore Prof. Trevor Blackburn (G. Vijay / Steve Mackay)

Core/Elective

Core

Pre/Co-requisites

None

Credit Points

3

Masters total course credit points = 48

(3 credits x 12 (units) + 12 credits (Thesis))

Mode of Delivery

On-Campus or Online

Unit Workload

10 hours per week: Lecture - 1 hour

Tutorial Lecture - 1 hours

Practical / Lab - 1 hour (where applicable)

Personal Study recommended - 7 hours (guided and unguided)

Unit Description and General Aims

The unit introduces engineers to the principles of power system stability under different system events including power system disturbances and evaluates system stability by utilizing an accurate power system dynamic model.

The unit will discuss the basic aspects of system stability theory and will cover topics of transient stability, small signal stability and voltage stability. Methods of improving stability in practical systems will also be discussed. The behaviour of a system under electromagnetic transients caused by switching and lightning transients and its effect on cables and lines, synchronous machines and switchgear will be discussed also.

After covering the necessary theory, the unit will introduce practical studies involving the simulation of various system conditions using an appropriate software tool and interpreting the results obtained.

This part will also include the estimation of machine parameters and the use of dynamic parameter estimation tools to compare estimated results from multiple sets of simulations involving model parameters and implement the most accurate results into the generator models.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this Unit, students are expected to be able to:

  1. Attain the required theoretical knowledge on power system stability principles and demonstrate the ability to accurately model a power system for carrying out different stability studies described in the subsequent outcomes.

    Bloom’s Level 5

  2. Demonstrate the ability to simulate small disturbances in the modelled system and study the effect on system stability.

    Bloom’s Level 5

  3. Demonstrate the ability to simulate large disturbances, and identify and evaluate the respective parameters.

    Bloom’s Level 5

  4. Establish through the studies the ability of the modelled power system to maintain steady voltages at all buses in the system after being subjected to a disturbance from a given initial operating condition.

    Bloom’s Level 5

  5. Simulate and analyse power system transient phenomena at microsecond-level such as switching and lightning transients.

    Bloom’s Level 5

  6. Draw and present conclusions on improving the models and practical measures to improve the different stability aspects.

Bloom’s Level 6

Bloom’s Taxonomy

The cognitive domain levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy:

Bloom’s

Level

Bloom’s

Category

Description

1

Knowledge

Recall, define and list facts, concepts, methods, terminologies, theories and structures.

2

Comprehension

Demonstrate understanding by comparing, organizing, describing, translating, interpreting, paraphrasing, explaining and distinguishing.

3

Application

Use knowledge to solve problems, identify connections and show relationships, in context.

4

Analysis

Examine information, breakdown a problem, determine relationships and causes, make inferences, classify and infer from evidence.

5

Synthesis

Produce a pattern from relationships, propose operations, formulate a design,

compose a hypothesis, reassemble information, construct, plan, invent, predict and create.

6

Evaluation

Make judgements based on evidence and external criteria, determine best practice, optimise, validate ideas, judge and critique, assess, valuate and

make recommendations.

Engineers Australia

The Australian Engineering Stage 1 Competency Standards for the Professional Engineer, approved as of 2013. This table is referenced in the mapping of graduate attributes to learning outcomes and via the learning outcomes to student assessment.

Stage 1 Competencies and Elements of Competency

1.

Knowledge and Skill Base

1.1

Comprehensive, theory based understanding of the underpinning natural and physical sciences and the engineering fundamentals applicable to the engineering discipline.

1.2

Conceptual understanding of the mathematics, numerical analysis, statistics, and computer and information sciences which underpin the engineering discipline.

1.3

In-depth understanding of specialist bodies of knowledge within the engineering discipline.

1.4

Discernment of knowledge development and research directions within the engineering discipline.

1.5

Knowledge of engineering design practice and contextual factors impacting the engineering discipline.

1.6

Understanding of the scope, principles, norms, accountabilities and bounds of sustainable engineering practice in the specific discipline.

2.

Engineering Application Ability

2.1

Application of established engineering methods to complex engineering problem solving.

2.2

Fluent application of engineering techniques, tools and resources.

2.3

Application of systematic engineering synthesis and design processes.

2.4

Application of systematic approaches to the conduct and management of engineering projects.

3.

Professional and Personal Attributes

3.1

Ethical conduct and professional accountability.

3.2

Effective oral and written communication in professional and lay domains.

3.3

Creative, innovative and pro-active demeanour.

3.4

Professional use and management of information.

3.5

Orderly management of self, and professional conduct.

3.6

Effective team membership and team leadership.

Graduate Attributes

Successfully completing this Unit will contribute to the recognition of attainment of the following graduate attributes aligned to the AQF Level 9 criteria, Engineers Australia Stage 1 Competency Standards for the Professional Engineer and the Washington Accord and the Program Level Outcomes (PLO):

Graduate Attributes / Program Level Outcomes (Knowledge, Skills, Abilities, Professional and Personal Development)

EA Stage 1 Competencies

Learning Outcomes

A. Effective Communication (PLO 1)

A1. Cognitive and technical skills to investigate, analyse and organise information and ideas and to communicate those ideas clearly and fluently, in both written and spoken forms appropriate to the audience.

2.2, 3.2

2, 3, 6

A2. Ability to professionally manage oneself, teams, information and projects and engage effectively and appropriately across a diverse range of international cultures in leadership, team and individual roles.

2.4, 3.2, 3.4,

3.5, 3.6

 

B. Critical Judgement (PLO 2)

B1. Ability to critically analyse and evaluate complex information and theoretical concepts.

1.1, 1.2, 1.3,

2.1

2, 3, 4, 5

B2. Ability to creatively, proactively and innovatively apply theoretical concepts, knowledge and approaches with a high level of accountability, in an engineering context.

1.5, 2.1, 3.3,

3.4

4, 5, 6

C. Design and Problem Solving Skills (PLO 3)

C1. Cognitive skills to synthesise, evaluate and use information from a broad range of sources to effectively identify, formulate and solve engineering problems.

1.5, 2.1, 2.3

1, 4, 5

C2. Technical and communication skills to design complex systems and solutions in line with developments in engineering professional practice.

2.2, 2.3

6

C3. Comprehension of the role of technology in society and identified issues in applying engineering technology ethics and impacts; economic; social; environmental and sustainability.

1.5, 1.6, 3.1

 

D. Science and Engineering Fundamentals (PLO 4)

D1. Breadth and depth of mathematics, science, computer technology and specialist engineering knowledge and understanding of future developments.

1.1, 1.2, 1.3,

1.4

2, 3

D2. Knowledge of ethical standards in relation to professional engineering

1.6, 3.1, 3.5

6

practice and research.

   

D3. Knowledge of international perspectives in engineering and ability to apply various national and International Standards.

1.5, 1.6, 2.4,

3.4

6

E. Information and Research Skills (PLO 5)

E1. Application of advanced research and planning skills to engineering projects.

1.4, 2.4, 3.6

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

E2. Knowledge of research principles and methods in an engineering context.

1.4, 1.6

2, 3, 4, 6

Unit Content and Learning Outcomes to Program Level Outcomes (PLO) via Bloom’s Taxonomy Level

This table details the mapping of the unit content and unit learning outcomes to the PLOs and graduate attributes at the corresponding Bloom’s Taxonomy level, specified by the number in the table.

 

Integrated Specification /

Program Learning Outcomes

PLO 1

PLO 2

PLO 3

PLO 4

PLO 5

Unit Learning Outcomes

LO1

-

-

5

-

5

LO2

5

5

-

5

5

LO3

5

5

-

5

5

LO4

-

5

5

-

5

LO5

-

5

5

-

5

LO6

6

6

6

6

6

Unit Study

Assessments

6

6

6

6

6

Lectures/Tutorials

6

6

6

6

6

 

Max Bloom’s level

6

6

6

5

6

Total PLO coverage

5

7

6

8

8

Student assessment

Assessment Type

(e.g. Assignment - 2000 word essay (specify topic) Examination (specify length and format))

When assessed (eg Week 5)

Weighting (% of total unit marks)

Learning Outcomes Assessed

Assessment 1

Type: Multi-choice test / Group work / Short answer questions / Role Play / Self-Assessment / Presentation

Topic examples: Stability, transient stability and system modelling

Week 5

20%

1, 2

Assessment 2

Type: Report / Research / Paper / Case Study / Site Visit

/ Problem analysis / Project / Professional recommendation

Example: Report (Midterm Project)

[This will include a progress report; literature review, hypothesis, and proposed solution with concept workings] Word length: 1000

Topic examples: Report on Transient stability

Week 8

25%

1, 2, 3

Assessment 3

Type: Report (Final Project)

[If a continuation of the midterm, this should complete the report by adding sections on: workings, implementation, results, verification/validation, conclusion/challenges and recommendations/future work. If this is a new report, all headings from the midterm and the final reports must be included.]

Word length: 2000

Topic examples: Continuation of midterm.

Final Week

35%

4, 5, 6

Practical Participation

Type: May be in the form of quizzes, class tests, practical assessments, remote labs, simulation software or case studies

Example: Software packages on renewable energy

Continuous

15%

5, 6

Attendance / Tutorial Participation

Example: Presentation, discussion, group work, exercises, self-assessment/reflection, case study analysis, application.

Continuous

5%

1-6

Prescribed and recommended readings

Required textbook(s)

1. Prabha Kundur, Power system stability and control, paperback, McGraw-Hill, 2005

Reference Materials

Unit Content

One topic is delivered per contact week, with the exception of part-time 24-week units, where one topic is delivered every two weeks.

Topics 1 and 2

Stability basics and system modelling

1. Power system stability: Considerations, definitions, classification of stability, rotor angle and voltage stability, synchronous machine representation, classical model, load modelling concepts, modelling of excitation systems, modelling of prime movers.

Topics 3 and 4

Transient stability theory

1. Transient stability: Swing equation, equal area criterion, solution of swing equation; numerical methods such as Euler method, Runge-Kutte method, critical clearing time and angle; effect of excitation system and governors; multimachine stability, extended equal area criterion and transient energy function approach.

Topics 5 and 6

Stability simulation for small signals

1. State space representation, Eigen values, modal matrices, small signal stability of single machine infinite bus system, synchronous machine classical model representation; effect of field circuit dynamics; of excitation system and small signal stability of multi machine system.

Topics 7 and 8

Voltage stability, electromagnetic transients

  1. Generation aspects, transmission system aspects, load aspects, PV curve, QV curve, PQ curve, analysis with static loads , loadability limit, sensitivity analysis, continuation power flow analysis and instability mechanism examples.

  2. Lightning surges including induced surges, switching transients for single pole and 3 pole switching, capacitor switching and high speed reclosing; switchgear transient recovery voltage (TRV) and effect on overhead line and cable systems.

Topic 9

Stability improvement

1. Transient stability enhancement, high speed fault clearing, steam turbine fast valving, high speed excitation systems, small signal stability enhancement, power system stabilizers, voltage stability enhancement and reactive power control.

Topics 10 and 11

Practical examples/Project

1. Using any industry standard software package, the students will carry out modelling and simulation exercises on a given power system and identify problems areas. The studies will include the estimation of machine parameters and the use of dynamic parameter estimation tools to compare estimated results from multiple sets of simulations involving model parameters and implement the most accurate results into the generator models. The students will interpret the results of the study and will present their recommendations on stability improvement measures.

Topic 12

Project and Revision

In the final week students will have an opportunity to review the contents covered so far. Opportunity will be provided for a review of student work, to clarify any outstanding issues, and to work on finalising the major assessment report.