High Voltage Training Online


High Voltage Training


High voltage
is described as any voltage exceeding 1000 V rms or 1000 V dc with current capability exceeding 2 mA ac or 3 mA dc, or for an impulse voltage generator having a stored energy in excess of 10 mJ. Anything over 50 V must be considered high voltage. Voltages over approximately 50 volts can usually cause dangerous amounts of current to flow through a human being touching two points of a circuit.

Growth in High Voltage Usage

Electricity is essential to modern life and all people are dealing with electricity directly or indirectly. Electricity is high-grade energy and working in the proximity of high voltage equipment involves danger. While commercial electricity has been around for over 100 years, the most common hazard of electricity has been electric shock or electrocution. As commercial electric systems grew, other hazardous effects such as arc-flash and arc-blast began to surface. The initiation, escalation, effects, and prevention of electrical arcs have been analyzed and researched since the early 1960’s. Human errors and equipment malfunctions contribute to the initiation of an electrical arc. Engineering design and construction of arc resistant equipment as well as requirements for safe work practices are continuing to target the risk of electrical arc-flash hazard. As the demand for electricity increases, transmission and distribution utility systems are being upgraded. Transformers are being upgraded or replaced with higher KVA ratings and lower impedances at both the utility and industrial/commercial level. Also, as the demand for higher reliability also increases, transformers are being operated in parallel by closing a tie breaker. All of these modifications to the system can cause dramatic increases in the available fault current. More electrical energy throughput is a result of these modifications; however the downside is an increase in the electrical current to feed a fault to existing equipment in industrial and commercial facilities that may now be under-rated to interrupt available fault current. This increase in available fault current can wreak havoc on under-rated and/or improperly maintained equipment.

These issues are explored in EIT’s Professional Certificate of Competency in Substation Design (Control, Protection and Facility Planning) 3-month course. Practical examples and case studies of high voltage substation protection are discussed live and online with industry experts.

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