Course at a Glance

Schedule

Code: CCI
Course Length: 3 Months

In this interactive 3 month LIVE ONLINE course, you will learn:

  • Basic control concepts
  • An introduction to sensors and transmitters
  • Different types of processes you may encounter
  • Different types of control
  • Optimum amount of filtering or dampening to apply to the measurement
  • Impact of control valves on control loop performance
  • PID controller behaviours
  • Troubleshooting and identifying problems
  • When to use derivative control for the best tuned loop
  • Differences between ideal/real/ interacting/ non-interacting controllers
  • A combination of control modes to use
  • Cascade control
  • Feed forward control
  • The significance of dead time and transfer lags
  • Expert systems
  • Justification for advanced control
  • Internal Model Control (IMC)
  • Model Predictive Control (MPC)
  • MPC representation, identification and observation

 

 

Course Details

Overview

This practical course covers all the essentials of process control and tools to optimize the operation of your plant and process, and regards the process, from the primary measuring device, through the controller, right down to the final control element as a chain with important links. Controllers need to be carefully matched to the process to work optimally; this matching procedure is called tuning. Controllers that are not correctly configured and tuned will not perform optimally and will not reduce variability in the process as they should. It is aimed at engineers and technicians who wish to have a clear, practical understanding of the essentials of instrumentation and final control elements typically found in common loops. It incorporates loop tuning, as well as how to optimize the operation of their particular plant or process. Mathematical theory has been kept to a minimum with the emphasis throughout on practical applications and useful information.

But it does not stop there. Advanced Process Control (APC) is an essential part of the modern plant. Small differences in process parameters can have large effects on profitability; get it right and profits continue to grow; get it wrong and there are major losses. Many applications of APC have pay back times well below one year. APC does require a detailed knowledge of the plant to design a working system and continual follow up along the life of the plant to ensure it is working optimally. Cascade Control, Feedforward control, control with long dead times, IMC and MPC are all considered, with respect to different applications. At the end of this course you will have the skills to troubleshoot / tune / deal with / understand a wide variety of process loops.

The Programs

  1. Calculating the process gain
  2. Dealing with P, I and D, both individually as well as in combinations, in various loops
  3. Stability aspects
  4. Ziegler Nichols open loop tuning
  5. Ziegler Nichols closed loop tuning
  6. Cohen-Coon tuning
  7. Pessen tuning for some / no overshoot
  8. Trial and error tuning
  9. Saturated and non-saturated output limits
  10. Cascade control
  11. Cascade control with one primary and two secondaries
  12. Ratio control
  13. Feedforward control
  14. Dead time compensation
  15. Gain scheduling
  16. Model predictive controller


COURSE OUTLINE

MODULE 1: PROCESS CONTROL INTRODUCTION, BASIC TERMS AND DEFINITIONS

Definitions of process variable, controlled variable and manipulated variable
Process gain, dead time and time constants
Speed, stability and robustness
Process noise


MODULE 2: BASIC CONTROL CONCEPTS

Typical manual control
Processes, controllers and tuning
First, second and third order processes
Resistive, capacitive and inertia aspects of a process


MODULE 3: LOOP TUNING PRINCIPLES: BASIC PRINCIPLES OF CONTROL SYSTEMS

Open loop control
Feedback control
On and off control
Modulation control


MODULE 4: STABILITY AND CONTROL MODES OF CLOSED LOOPS

Cause of instability in control loops
Change of stability through PID control modes
Methods to improve stability
Principles of closed loop control tuning
Different rules compared
Rules of thumb in tuning


MODULE 5: INTRODUCTION TO SENSORS AND TRANSMITTERS

Selection and specification of devices
Pressure transmitters
Flow meters
Level transmitter
Temperature sensors


MODULE 6: INTRODUCTION TO CONTROL VALVES

Basic principles
Rotary and linear control valves
Control valve characteristics and specifications
Hysteresis
Stiction


MODULE 7: SPECIALIZED CONTROLLER SETTINGS AND GOOD PRACTICE: IDEAL PID VS REAL PID

Non-field-interactive or ideal PID
Field-interactive or real PID
Selection of ideal or real PID
Choice of saturated vs non-saturated output limits


MODULE 8: GOOD PRACTICE FOR TUNING OF CLOSED LOOP CONTROL

Good practice for common loop problems
Flow control loop characteristics
Level control loop characteristics
Temperature control loop characteristics
Pressure control loop characteristics
Other less common loops


MODULE 9: LOOP TUNING PRINCIPLES AND STABILITY: CASCADE CONTROL

Equation types for cascade control
Initialisation and PV-tracking
Use of multiple outputs in cascade control
Tuning procedure for cascade control


MODULE 10: FEEDFORWARD CONTROL

Feedforward balance - a control concept
Ratio control
Combined feedforward and feedback control
The problem of long dead-time in closed loops


MODULE 11: EXPERT SYSTEMS AND MODEL BASED SELF TUNING CONTROLLERS

Self tuning loops
Adaptive control
Fuzzy logic control
Gain scheduling

JUSTIFICATION OF ADVANCED CONTROL
Advanced vs classical control
Advanced on-line control vs statistical process control
Comparison of pay back time on real examples

INTERNAL MODEL CONTROL (IMC)
Open loop model in parallel with the process
Control system in two blocks
Equivalence with a classical controller
Disturbances rejection and control
IMC and delays and feedforward


MODULE 12: MODEL PREDICTIVE CONTROL (MPC)

Single input/output vs multivariable control
Example on a binary column causality graph
Constraints and planning ahead
Different models


 

Learning and Teaching

Benefits of eLearning to Students

  • Cost effective: no travel or accommodation necessary
  • Interactive: live, interactive sessions let you communicate with your instructor and fellow students
  • Flexible: short interactive sessions over the Internet which you can attend from your home or office. Learn while you earn!
  • Practical: perform exercises by remotely accessing our labs and simulation software
  • Expert instructors: instructors have extensive industry experience; they are not just 'academics'
  • No geographical limits: learn from any location, all you need is an Internet connection
  • Constant support: from your instructor(s) and a dedicated Learning Support Officer for the complete duration of the course
  • International insight: interact and network with participants from around the globe and gain valuable insight into international practice 


Benefits of eLearning to Employers

  • Lower training costs: no travel or accommodation necessary
  • Less downtime: short webinars (60-90 minutes) and flexible training methods means less time away from work
  • Retain employees: keep staff who may be considering a qualification as full time study
  • Increase efficiency: improve your engineering or technical employees’ skills and knowledge
  • International insight: students will have access to internationally based professional instructors and students

 

How Does it Work?

EIT eLearning courses involve a combination of live, interactive sessions over the Internet with a professional instructor, set readings, and assignments. The courses include simulation software and remote laboratory applications to let you put theory to practice, and provide you with constant support from a dedicated Learning Support Officer.


Practical Exercises and Remote Laboratories

As part of the groundbreaking new way of teaching, our online engineering courses use a series of remote laboratories (labs) and simulation software, to facilitate your learning and to test the knowledge you gain during your course. These involve complete working labs set up at various locations of the world into which you will be able to log to and proceed through the various practical sessions.

These will be supplemented by simulation software, running either remotely or on your computer, to ensure you gain the requisite hands-on experience. No one can learn much solely from lectures, the labs and simulation software are designed to increase the absorption of the materials and to give you a practical orientation of the learning experience. All this will give you a solid, practical exposure to the key principles covered and will ensure that you obtain maximum benefit from your course.

 

Endorsed by ISA

School of Industrial Automation