3D printed robotic hand: a new direction for prosthetics?

 

We came across another appealing article written by Leo Kelion at BBC News, this time on a prototype 3D-printed robotic hand that can be made faster and more cheaply than current alternatives.

Some of the article is below.

 

A prototype 3D-printed robotic hand that can be made faster and more cheaply than current alternatives is this year's UK winner of the James Dyson Award.

The Bristol-raised creator of the Open Bionics project says he can 3D-scan an amputee and build them a custom-fitted socket and hand in less than two days.

It typically takes weeks or months to obtain existing products.

Joel Gibbard says he aims to start selling the prosthetics next year. "We have a device at the lower-end of the pricing scale and the upper end of functionality," he told the BBC.

"At the same time it is very lightweight and it can be customised for each person.

"The hand is basically a skeleton with a 'skin' on top. So, we can do different things to the skin - we can put patterns on it, we can change the styling and design. There's quite a lot of flexibility there."

 

Interested in this area?

 

Do you want to know how to create a 3D model of that design concept stuck in your head – or even learn how to physically 3D print it? Then EIT's NEW Professional Certificate of Competency in 3D Printing and Design course is for you! The next intake is scheduled for October 6, 2015.

It will empower you with the skills and know-how you need.

The goal of this course is to educate you on the technical details of 3D modelling and 3D printing. You will be introduced to Computer Aided Design methodologies, and will be guided through the development of 3D modelled parts, assemblies, and the general movement clearances and design principles. Basic introduction to material properties, design for manufacture, and cost optimization is discussed. You will be given the opportunity to design a basic scale model with movable parts for printing using a 3D printer.

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